Books from 2018 & my suggestions for 2019

For my first blog of the new year, I thought I’d go over the books I read in 2018, and the ones I would suggest that others read in 2019.

  1. You’ll Never Know Dear
  2. More Happy Than Not
  3. Work Ethic in Industrial America, 1850-1920
  4. Giving Preservation a History
  5. Building a Nation
  6. Race and Reunion: US Civil War
  7. Murdering McKinley
  8. First Ladies
  9. Shattered Dreams
  10. Banana Cultures
  11. Hope in a Jar: making America’s beauty culture
  12. Goat Castle: Race, Murder in the Gothic South
  13. Warfare State
  14. Impossible Subjects
  15. Notes from the Cracked Ceiling
  16. Why Preservation Matters
  17. Bending the Future
  18. Women, Partisanship, and Congress
  19. Highest Glass Ceiling
  20. Thinking Small
  21. First woman cabinet member
  22. The woman behind the New Deal
  23. EMILY’s list
  24. Beyond Preservation
  25. From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime the Making of Mass Incarceration in America
  26. Dark Places
  27. Four Hour Work Week
  28. The Big Bad Wolf
  29. Salem’s Lot
  30. Gastonia 1929
  31. Martyr of Loray Mill
  32. The Latino Migration Experience to North Carolina.
  33. Gaston County Memories
  34. The Thirteenth Juror
  35. Latino Farmworkers in the Eastern United States Health, Safety, and Justice
  36. Making Time for History
  37. For Our Little Children
  38. Maya of Morganton
  39. Scratching Out a Living
  40. See Jane Run
  41. Sorority
  42. Roanoke Girls
  43. Latino Workers in the Contemporary South
  44. On the Line
  45. Voices from the Nueva Frontera: Latino Immigration in Dalton, Georgia
  46. The Baptism of Early Virginia
  47. Damned Women: Sinners and Witches in Puritan New England
  48. The Indian Great Awakening: Religion and the Shaping of Native Cultures in Early America
  49. Revolutionary Backlash: Women and Politics in the Early American Republic
  50. Soul by Soul: Inside the Antebellum Slave Market
  51. Making Slavery History: Abolitionism and the politics of memory in Massachusetts
  52. The market revolution: Jacksonian America, 181501846
  53. Free soil, free labor, free men
  54. Revolutionary Mothers
  55. Disorderly Women
  56. Women of the Republic
  57. Claiming the Pen
  58. Mere Equals: The paradox of educated women in early American republic
  59. Liberty’s daughters: the revolutionary experience
  60. We have raised all of you
  61. Teaching History in the Digital Age
  62. Writing History in the Digital Age

 

My suggestions in no particular order:

Murdering McKinley – despite a pretty significant knowledge of American history this was an insightful book to the way that Roosevelt reshaped the American consciousness once he became president and the author gives an interesting argument that I had never considered, that by trying to forget McKinley, Roosevelt effectively murdered him a second time

Women of the Republic – another book used in graduate school this semester, this was an interesting look at how women of the Revolutionary Era were useful as more than just housewives and how even just a housewife could have influence of the revolutionary mindset

Damned Women – a great read about the witch trials, nothing more needs to be said

From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime the Making of Mass Incarceration in America- similar to “13th” on Netflix, I 10/10 recommend this and watching that together, you’ll have a new outlook on the mass incarceration and how the prison system is our country has become a for-profit industry

Hope in a Jar: making America’s beauty culture- how America has sold to women (and in some cases men) that they need particular products to be considered attractive, a great read for all my pageant folks

Goat Castle: Race, Murder in the Gothic South – written by a professor at UNCC (go niners!), this is a specific case exploration of murder in Mississippi and how a young African-American woman was accused and convicted when she had no connection. A strange, real-life crime story.

Notes from the cracked ceiling (also maybe add Emily’s List right after this)- eye-opening accounts of the struggle for women to earn a place in government and politics

 

 

What did you read in 2018? What are your book suggestions for this year?